UNLV Boyd School of Law to launch gaming and regulatory online courses - Yogonet International

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UNLV Boyd School of Law to launch gaming and regulatory online courses - Yogonet International UNLV Boyd School of Law to launch gaming and regulatory online courses - Yogonet International Posted: 10 Nov 2020 12:00 AM PST T he UNLV William S. Boyd School of Law announced today that it will develop an online training program for operators, regulators, lawyers and others who work in and around the worldwide gaming industry. The mostly asynchronous classes, which will launch during the first and second quarters of 2021, will be created and taught by instructors with decades of professional gaming and teaching experience. The online courses, funded by a gift from the GVC Foundation U.S. , will ultimately consist of eight classes designed to prepare professionals to meet the sophisticated regulatory and operating challenges facing the gaming industry. Students are not required to hold a Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree or first degree of law requi

9 free computer science classes you can get a certificate for taking - Business Insider - Business Insider

9 free computer science classes you can get a certificate for taking - Business Insider - Business Insider


9 free computer science classes you can get a certificate for taking - Business Insider - Business Insider

Posted: 06 Apr 2020 01:03 PM PDT

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The computer science courses below are free to enroll in, and include a certificate of completion that you can add to your resume and LinkedIn.
Coursera

Online-learning site Coursera announced in late March that it would be offering 100 classes for free until May 31, 2020, to support access to online education for the one-third of the world that's practicing some form of isolation right now. 

Among the 100 courses offered, there are nine computer science courses that you can enroll in for free and earn a certificate for completing. They're taught by some of the best universities in the world, or by high-profile institutions like Google Cloud that are offering specialized insight into their field.

You can audit Coursera courses for free throughout the year, but auditing doesn't give students access to the full features that are included in this promotion, like graded homework, projects, unlimited access to a course's reading material, and a verified certificate of completion that you can add to your CV, resume, and LinkedIn profile. 

Here's how to enroll in Coursera courses for free:

  1. Click on the class you'd like to take below and make sure that there's a blue promo banner at the top of the page. If not, refresh the page and let it load fully. 
  2. Click the "Enroll for free" button.
  3. Select "Purchase Course." If the promo has applied, it should say below that "Your promotion will automatically be applied at checkout." 
  4. At checkout, the course should state $0.

Coursera also included a few free computer science classes taught by Princeton in this promotion, which you can complete, but that don't include certificates (because they never have): Algorithms, Part I, Algorithms, Part II, Analysis of Algorithms, Computer Science: Algorithms, Theory, and Machines, and Computer Science: Programming with a Purpose

You can find the full list of Coursera's 100 free courses here, which range in topics, target ages, and from developing new career skills to diving into personal interests and building new hobbies. 

9 Coursera computer science classes you can take and receive a certificate of completion for free:

Can’t go outside? At least you can go to Harvard. - Boston.com

Posted: 01 Apr 2020 12:00 AM PDT

By now, chances are that social distancing and a lack of structure to your day have you feeling more than a little bored. Besides scouring streaming services and eating all the take-out you can stomach, what if you put your time to use by learning something new? 

EdX, the Cambridge-based online learning institution founded at Harvard and MIT, offers more than 2,500 free online courses from partner universities all over the globe. Free, self-paced courses on a slew of topics mean you can learn the fundamentals of neuroscience from Harvard instructor David Cox or explore the pyramids of Giza while still in your bathrobe. 

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It's no surprise that with everyone stuck inside, Anant Agarwal, founder and co-CEO of EdX, has noticed an uptick in users, according to the platform's traffic data.

"We hope that EdX can serve as a resource for learners during this time of uncertainty," Agarwal said. "Whether they are coming to us to help them learn more about the information they are hearing on the news, or using their time at home to learn something new just because it's a nice distraction." 

Course resources include videos, reading materials, discussion forums, and — if you pursue a verified certificate in the class — graded assignments. The effort for each class varies from a few hours per week as you learn about the rise of superheroes in pop culture with instructors from the Smithsonian, to around 10 hours a week as professors from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid introduce you to the world of java programming.

Register for free before browsing the treasure trove of knowledge. Courses can be audited for free, or a fee will add an instructor-signed verified certificate upon the successful completion of a course.

Here are EdX's most popular classes ever (or search for yourself here):  

EdX also offers online degree programs and professional certificates, and in January launched its MicroBachelors programs, which Agarwal said are aimed at the 36 million Americans who have completed some college but not a degree. The first MicroBachelors courses focus on computer science, and, along with the MicroMasters program, it counts toward real college credit and allows students to break degrees into shorter, less-expensive chunks.  

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"We're hopeful that EdX can help foster a sense of community, connectivity, and learning," Agarwal said.


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