Institute for American Musical Theatre Announces 'Creators' Program - Broadway World

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Institute for American Musical Theatre Announces 'Creators' Program - Broadway World Institute for American Musical Theatre Announces 'Creators' Program - Broadway World UB vocal students continue their passion for singing during COVID - University at Buffalo The Spectrum Bowdoin International Music Festival presents harpist June Han - pressherald.com UNR Students: Remote learning for remainder of semester won't change much - ThisisReno Raymond Melcer | Obituary | New Castle News - New Castle News Institute for American Musical Theatre Announces 'Creators' Program - Broadway World Posted: 27 Nov 2020 04:58 AM PST New York City's Institute for American Musical Theatre is moving forward with plans for its unique 2-year "Creators" program. Built and run by award winning lyricist-librettist Sam Carner (Island Song, Unlock'd), the n

As Learning Moves Online, Design Students Across the Nation Grapple With Uncertainty - Architectural Digest

As Learning Moves Online, Design Students Across the Nation Grapple With Uncertainty - Architectural Digest


As Learning Moves Online, Design Students Across the Nation Grapple With Uncertainty - Architectural Digest

Posted: 27 Apr 2020 10:38 AM PDT

When Parsons interior design students shuffled out of their midterm exams last month, they were in a rush to get home. Not only had their critiques run late into the evening, but they were scrambling to follow their school's latest edict surrounding COVID-19—that courses would operate remotely through mid April. As the elevator descended, Savannah Smith, who is due to graduate with her associate's degree in May, recalls joking to her classmates, "Oh, my God, this is 'bye' for everyone!" Little did she know she was right. Just days later, the school announced that classes would be conducted online for the rest of the term and that all in-person events—including commencement—would be canceled or moved online.

Similar scenes have played out at university campuses nationwide as academic life is upended by the coronavirus pandemic. American design schools, usually bustling hives of activity, are now eerily empty. At Harvard Graduate School of Design's iconic Gund Hall, hastily packed student cubicles sit vacant. At the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, the doors along a row of student housing are sealed shut with blue painter's tape.

The interior design and architecture students who once occupied these spaces are just now acclimating to a new reality defined by Zoom lectures and virtual pinups. In addition to coping with the usual feelings of anxiety that accompany tough course loads, some feel hamstrung by a lack of access to their studios and their peers, and powerless due to the chaos unfolding just outside their windows. Graduating students, in particular, wonder if there will be a job waiting for them on the other side of the crisis.

"It's hard not to be disappointed that the second half of your semester is online," says Smith, who, like so many higher ed students across America, is currently working from her family home. "I've been like, 'Am I ever finding a job?'"

"I think everyone is just really sad," echoes Jing Wang, who is on track to receive her B.Arch from Cornell University this spring. "We had to move everything out on such a short notice. Since we're graduating, we don't know if we're going to see each other again."

There is no precise estimate for the number of U.S. design students who are remote right now, but those numbers are almost certainly high. According to the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA), the organization that oversees learning standards of interior design schools, as many as 18,000 students are currently learning remotely. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), meanwhile, told AD PRO that it estimates that some architecture programs are now online, but given that some 25,000 students are enrolled in accredited programs and that the majority of the country is under lockdown orders, the number of M.Arch and B.Arch students learning remotely could be as high.

One of the hardest adjustments design students say they've had to make is the whirlwind transition to online-only courses. Many schools extended spring break to allow additional time for students to vacate dormitories as social distancing orders were put in place, and for administrators and instructors to develop a virtual curriculum. But architecture and interior design students are encountering unexpected hurdles, especially in navigating a discipline that straddles digital and physical making.

That starts with the technology students have at home. "My family is a household of Mac users, but a lot of interior design and architecture programs are far better on PCs or only work on PCs," explains Smith, the Parsons interior design student. "I was someone who definitely relied on the school's resources and would go in on weekends to do certain kinds of homework, which obviously is no longer an option." (A university spokesperson said that administrators distributed a tech survey and "moved quickly to distribute laptops and needed tech to support those students." Parsons is also developing plans to allow class of 2020 design students access to its Making Center beyond graduation.)

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