Alternative Credentials, Scaled Degrees, and the New Higher Ed Matthew Effect | Learning Innovation - Inside Higher Ed

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Alternative Credentials, Scaled Degrees, and the New Higher Ed Matthew Effect | Learning Innovation - Inside Higher EdAlternative Credentials, Scaled Degrees, and the New Higher Ed Matthew Effect | Learning Innovation - Inside Higher EdPosted: 10 Aug 2020 01:44 PM PDT HBS Online saw a 650 percent increase in enrollment between April and June compared to the same period in 2019…Online degrees offered by the Gies College of Business, including an iMBA priced under $22,000 offered in partnership with online learning platform Coursera, have seen record applications this year, Elliott said. Applications have particularly increased among women. More than 2,500 applications have so far been submitted to the iMBA program starting this fall -- a 35 percent increase from August 2019.Since mid-March, more than 18 million registered users have joined Coursera, a more than 400 percent increase from the same time period last year. Enrollments in India increased by 1,044 percent, followed by Italy at…

How will new ICE rule preventing international students from taking only online classes affect Marylanders? - Baltimore Sun

How will new ICE rule preventing international students from taking only online classes affect Marylanders? - Baltimore Sun


How will new ICE rule preventing international students from taking only online classes affect Marylanders? - Baltimore Sun

Posted: 09 Jul 2020 06:59 AM PDT

This timeline could be especially challenging for the Maryland schools with the greatest numbers of international students. The University System of Maryland, which includes about a dozen campuses in the state, has nearly 4,000 foreign undergraduates, 38% of whom attend University of Maryland, and more than 5,000 foreign graduate students, 66% of whom attend Maryland.

The University of Wisconsin Stevens Point offers free online courses to everyone - WQOW TV News 18

Posted: 16 Jun 2020 12:00 AM PDT

STEVENS POINT, Wis. (WAOW) -- During a time of uncertainty people may have lost their jobs or even their entire business forcing them to look elsewhere for income.

In response to the coronavirus pandemic, The University of Wisconsin Stevens Point (UWSP) is offering a free chance for anyone to continue their education.

"These are actually what we consider non-credit or training and development courses so they are open to the public, they don't have to go through the admissions process but we have them register and have customer service to support their experience," said Wayne Sorenson, Director of Continuing Education Outreach at UWSP.

The courses are designed to learn new skills, sharpen old ones, or even get a certificate in your field of choice which Wayne says, "they're able to identify where they have a gap or where they have an interest or where they need a certain skill to advance."

There are plenty of course options to choose from including web page development. supervision management, personal finance, and more.

Oncethe course is completed you will receive a certificate of completion.

But as far as how you use your certificate, well, Wayne says that's really up to you and the position you're in with your career.

For more information and how to register, click/tap here.

INSIGHT KANSAS: COVID, backlash and the future of the online university - hays Post

Posted: 11 Jul 2020 04:14 AM PDT

Michael Smith is a professor at Emporia State University.
Michael Smith is a professor at Emporia State University.

With the COVID-19 pandemic showing no signs of subsiding, it may not be realistic for universities to re-open this fall in any but the most guarded way, if at all. However, once the pandemic does subside, college students will be anxious to get back on campus.

How things do change. Ten years ago, trendspotters pronounced the death of the brick-and-mortar campus. Online classes were the future, they said. We now have nearly two decades of experience delivering online instruction. Here are a few of the biggest lessons.

First, students who can take their classes face to face prefer to do so. A December 2019 EDUCAUSE poll found that 70 precent of students prefer their classes face-to-face.

Students reported a great deal of anxiety about this spring's online migration, and some had difficulty completing their semesters in this format.

So-called "traditional" college students, who attend college shortly after high school, are particularly adamant in their preference for on-campus instruction.

They may be digital natives, but they still crave in-person interaction with their peers and professors.

Even some older, "nontraditional" students prefer their courses on campus. Some students may add one online class per semester to their schedules for flexibility, but they are still clamoring for a return to campus after the pandemic subsides.

Second, MOOCs found their niches—and they will not be replacing face-to-face classes. A decade ago, Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs) were the fad.

These large, online courses are often taught by professors at big-name universities such as Yale. They are accessible through for-profit online portals like Coursera.

Generally, viewers may take the courses for free unless they want a certificate of completion, in which case they take exams and pay tuition.

Observers thought these would replace traditional instruction. Instead, MOOCs found two narrower niches: those simply curious to learn new things without earning a degree and those seeking profession-specific credentials in a flexible, online format.

Some MOOCs deserve a second look, such as a very popular Science of Well Being course taught by Yale Professor Laurie Santos, plus several new classes for those seeking to become more scientifically literate in the age of COVID. However, MOOCs are not generally a threat to the traditional college curriculum.

Third, most students seeking online degree programs choose state or nonprofit private universities located within a 50-mile radius of their homes.

While for-profit, all-online programs have found their niche, most students seek their online degrees from a traditional university that also offers on-campus programs.

Online, professionally oriented master's degrees and professional certificates are particularly popular. State universities often offer better instruction and lower costs than our for-profit competition, and many of these classes are taught or at least supervised by the same full-time, on-campus faculty who also teach face-to-face classes.

Online college has matured and found its proper role in the curriculum, and that role is not to displace most on-campus instruction. Expect students to demand that their campuses re-open once this pandemic subsides.

Michael Smith is a professor at Emporia State University.

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