Fox's Tubi Just Surpassed Peacock as the Free Streaming Name to Watch - Nasdaq

Fox's Tubi Just Surpassed Peacock as the Free Streaming Name to Watch - Nasdaq Fox's Tubi Just Surpassed Peacock as the Free Streaming Name to Watch - Nasdaq Posted: 01 Feb 2021 12:00 AM PST [unable to retrieve full-text content] Fox's Tubi Just Surpassed Peacock as the Free Streaming Name to Watch    Nasdaq You are subscribed to email updates from "fully online ota program,online mba programs" - Google News . To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now . Email delivery powered by Google Google, 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043, United States

Music in the Mountains presents holiday favorites - The Union of Grass Valley

Music in the Mountains presents holiday favorites - The Union of Grass Valley


Music in the Mountains presents holiday favorites - The Union of Grass Valley

Posted: 08 Dec 2020 07:38 PM PST

Music in the Mountains' Pete Nowlen conducts the orchestra during the Patriotic Pops concert in 2019. Join MIM for holiday classics virtually on Dec. 11.
Union file photo

On Friday, Dec.11, at 7 p.m., Music in the Mountains will be streaming a new Holiday Concert on their Youtube channel that is available to the public. The show will feature a variety of everyone's holiday favorites and classics. Several numbers were recorded at the newly renovated Center for the Arts, featuring a state of the art Meyers Sound System.

It's that time of the year when the excitement of the holiday season is upon us. While so much of our lives have been very different this year, music endures. Music in the Mountains (MIM) encourages the community to join its virtual holiday celebration. The concert will include all new performances of some favorite holiday tunes. Enjoy virtual recordings by the MIM Chorus, MIM brass players, The California Youth Symphony, and special guests.

"This year will be the first time since 2008, I am not able to be with you all in person for the MIM holiday concert," said MIM Artistic Director & Conductor, Ryan Murray. "And although, I can't wait until we can celebrate in person again, I am looking forward to sharing some great music and our favorite memories of the holidays."

MIM is bringing back Carrie Hennessey, Omari Tau & Jennifer Reason to share holiday cheer with all of us. This trio first performed together in Nevada County back in 2015 at MIM's Saints & Sinners Cabaret show. From the warmth of Ms. Reason's piano playing to Ms. Hennessey's soaring soprano to Mr. Tau's melodic baritone, the holidays have never sounded this good.

"Nothing conjures a warm holiday mood like our favorite music," said Executive Director Jenny Darlington-Person. "Much like MIM's traditional concert, this show includes solos, full chorus and orchestra repertoire, and sing-a-longs. So tell your loved ones, grab your favorite holiday beverage, and tune in with us to share in this long standing Nevada County tradition reimagined for 2020."

The show will premiere on Dec. 11 at 7 p.m. on the MIM Youtube channel, and will be available again on Christmas Eve through Christmas Day. Go to musicinthemountains.org and RSVP for a direct link to the show.

In 2021, Music in the Mountains will celebrate 40 years of bringing live classical music to the Sierra Foothills, the Sacramento Metropolitan area, and surrounding communities. Navigating the on-going state and local government health regulations for large event gatherings, MIM has moved their annual programming to online platforms for all to enjoy. The programs are presented on a "pay-what-you-can" basis and folks are encouraged to RSVP by going to the MIM website at http://www.musicinthemountains.org

Safety protocols were followed in the creation of this program. Chorus and orchestra repertoire was recorded virtually and safety guidelines were followed during the recording at the Center for the Arts, including, but not limited to, mask wearing and social distancing.

Source: Music in the Mountains

Senior musicians on using quarantine as a growing experience - Student Life

Posted: 08 Dec 2020 06:11 PM PST

As the first semester of fully COVID-adapted courses is slowly reaching a merciful finish, most students are daydreaming past the spring semester to a hopeful return to normalcy in the fall of 2021. Unfortunately for this year's seniors, the hamstrung Wash. U. experience of the last nine months will likely continue until their graduation. For seniors studying music, the likelihood of showcasing their final works and performing for a live audience is small. Nearly every class in the music department, from theory to vocal lessons, has been moved online, and ensembles such as jazz band and a cappella have been unable to meet in-person this semester in accordance with University guidelines.  

Interim Chair of Music Alexander Stefaniak says that while the department's intellectual rigor has remained, the learning experience has shifted, as students have replaced live performances with recorded projects. "Because ensembles can't meet as large groups in person, they've been using the semester to develop skills and knowledge that they can put into practice when we all return to in-person rehearsals," Stefaniak said in an email. Even with valiant efforts from professors to give students the same opportunities to showcase their work, COVID requires taking precautions that simply are not conducive to live performance.  

The experience for music students is changing in other ways as well. "I have noticed that adapting my teaching has really pushed me to think carefully about what I consider essential in my courses: what my core objectives are, and how I can reach those in new ways," Stefaniak said. To that end, music professors have started using streaming and social media to sustain their performance-driven instruction. But without conservatories—or even classrooms—to fill, musicians, especially those in their final year, have worked to find new channels for expression.

These musicians have been left to create on their own and find new outlets into which they can channel their passion. Senior Mitch Frauenheim has taken to Zoom performances with his fellow "bubble-mates" in order to savor his time with friends.  Like many others in his position, he has jumped at any opportunity he can find to play as a group in his final year. "We play on our porch on Tuesdays," he said. "There's a couple of horns guys that we know, and we Zoom it out and we have great turnout."

Going forward, Frauenheim wants to find an opportunity to combine his computer science abilities with a musical flair. "I think it'd be cool to find some kind of company that is involved in music," he said. "I would still like to have that as part of what I'm working for." For the time being, though, Frauenheim is simply looking to enjoy playing in any capacity.  

For Aalisha Jaisinghani, a senior pursuing a Bachelor of Music degree, the time away from her rigorous on-campus routine allowed her to rethink her relationship with music and her future studies. As has become a subtle yet pervasive theme of quarantine, Jaisinghani has narrowed in on her priorities, realizing her true calling may not be at the piano, as she originally thought, but rather producing her own original content. 

"If things hadn't gotten canceled, I would have never released my own music, which I finally started doing after all my performances just stopped," she said. "The fact that quarantine happened and everyone's on their phones means getting content out there is easier than it's ever been."

Jaisinghani substituted performing in conservatory recitals for creating videos of her own music on TikTok, which she says was a welcome surprise in effectively pushing her content out. As she continues to create her own music and applies to graduate school for music, her focus has shifted to curating her own film scores, though performing on the piano remains a passion. "I want my name on something," she said. "I want a theme to play and everyone knows what it is even if they haven't seen the movie." 

With time on her own and decisions looming, Jaisinghani says quarantine broadened her ambitions at just the right moment. While they may not be in front of a filled auditorium, these two seniors and many others have managed to keep the performance going as they zoom towards the graduation stage. 

Music in the Mountains Presents Your Holiday Favorites - YubaNet

Posted: 08 Dec 2020 07:01 AM PST

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December 8, 2020 – On Friday, December 11th, 2020 at 7pm, Music in the Mountains will be streaming a new Holiday Concert on their YouTube channel that is available to the public. The show will feature a variety of everyone's holiday favorites and classics. Several numbers were recorded at the newly renovated Center for the Arts, featuring a state of the art Meyers Sound System.*

It's that time of the year when the excitement of the holiday season is upon us. While so much of our lives have been very different this year, music endures. Music in the Mountains (MIM) encourages the community to join its virtual holiday celebration. The concert will include all new performances of some favorite holiday tunes. Enjoy virtual recordings by the MIM Chorus, MIM brass players, The California Youth Symphony, and special guests.

"This year will be the first time since 2008, I am not able to be with you all in person for the MIM holiday concert," said MIM Artistic Director & Conductor, Ryan Murray. "And although, I can't wait until we can celebrate in person again, I am looking forward to sharing some great music and our favorite memories of the holidays."

MIM is bringing back Carrie Hennessey, Omari Tau & Jennifer Reason to share holiday cheer with all of us. This trio first performed together in Nevada County back in 2015 at MIM's Saints & Sinners Cabaret show. From the warmth of Ms. Reason's piano playing to Ms. Hennessey's soaring soprano to Mr. Tau's melodic baritone, the holidays have never sounded this good. 

 "Nothing conjures a warm holiday mood like our favorite music," said Executive Director, Jenny Darlington-Person. "Much like MIM's traditional concert, this show includes solos, full chorus and orchestra repertoire, and sing-a-longs. So tell your loved ones, grab your favorite holiday beverage, and tune in with us to share in this long standing Nevada County tradition reimagined for 2020."

The show will premiere on December 11th at 7:00 PM on the MIM Youtube channel, and will be available again on Christmas Eve through Christmas Day. Go to musicinthemountains.org and RSVP for a direct link to the show.

In 2021, Music in the Mountains will celebrate 40 years of bringing live classical music to the Sierra Foothills, the Sacramento Metropolitan area, and surrounding communities. Navigating the on-going state and local government health regulations for large event gatherings, MIM has moved their annual programming to online platforms for all to enjoy. The programs are presented on a "pay-what-you-can" basis and folks are encouraged to RSVP by going to the MIM website at www.musicinthemountains.org

*Note: safety protocols were followed in the creation of this program. Chorus and orchestra repertoire was recorded virtually and safety guidelines were followed during the recording at the Center for the Arts, including, but not limited to, mask wearing and social distancing. 

  • What: Holiday Concert
  • Where: Live on Youtube.com presented by Music in the Mountains
  • When: Friday, December 11th 2020; repeat Christmas Eve & Christmas Day
  • Time: 7pm
  • Price: Pay What You Can
  • RSVP for link: www.musicinthemountains.org

Lester remembered for his love of music, Christ - State-Journal.com

Posted: 08 Dec 2020 03:50 PM PST

When Za Thomas Lester, known around these parts as Z.T., passed away Thursday at the age of 90, he did so as he lived, surrounded by his family who sung the Christmas carols and music that came to define his life.

Lester served as the minister of music at Buck Run Baptist Church for 35 years and was a trendsetter among Kentucky Baptist churches, according to Dr. Hershel York, senior pastor at the church.

"During that time, several pastors came and left, but Z.T. remained a steady influence who made an indelible mark on the lives of everyone who worshiped here," York said.

"Whether it was the Living Christmas Tree, the Easter Cantata, youth choir (the Ichthus Singers) tours, worship banners or orchestra in the worship services, Z.T. was doing stuff that no one else was doing and before anyone else was thinking about it, especially in a church the size of Buck Run."

In the 1930s, one of the caroling traditions in homes was to sing around the Christmas tree. Belhaven College, now Belhaven University, in Jackson, Mississippi, became the first place to have a Living Christmas Tree or Singing Christmas Tree, which is constructed of steel, holds more than 30 choral singers and is used as part of nativity plays.

Church music was his primary focus and in addition to Buck Run, Lester also served in churches in Mackville, Willisburg, Lebanon and Lexington.

York said when he became pastor at Buck Run, Z.T. "had my back" and did everything he could to help him succeed.

"When some people struggled to adapt to me as their pastor, Z.T. would speak up for me and assert his confidence that I was God's man for this church," York added. "I can never be grateful enough for what that meant and how encouraged I was."

A graduate of Cornishville High School, Georgetown College and the University of Kentucky, Lester was an educator and spent 40 years as a teacher, supervisor and principal in school systems in Washington, Scott, Garrard and Owen counties. He was principal at Willisburg High and Elementary School, Scott County High School and Camp Dick Robinson Elementary School.

Lester will be remembered as a family man and leaves behind his wife of 69 years, Vivian Lester.

"He and Vivian were one of those rare husband-wife teams that were genuinely one flesh. They did everything together and were a perfect complement to one another," York said. "They were inseparable and invincible, always modeling what it means to serve together for the glory of Christ."

Lester is also survived by four sons, Dr. Terry Lester, the Rev. Jerry Lester, Tim Lester and the Rev. Todd Lester; eight grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Z.T. Lesetr was a Christ-centered man whose whole life was directed toward the Lord and serving his church, York said.

"Three of his four sons entered the ministry, and all of them have been greatly used of the Lord. What a testimony they all bear to the influence of their father."

"I thank God for the life and memory of Z.T. Lester. A great saint of God has gone home," York added. "I know he heard his Savior say, 'Well done, good and faithful servant.'"

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