Occupational Therapy Assistant - Felician College

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VSO's 'Music for Days Like This': 4 cellos, 2 percussionists and a lot of unexpected - Barre Montpelier Times Argus

VSO's 'Music for Days Like This': 4 cellos, 2 percussionists and a lot of unexpected - Barre Montpelier Times Argus


VSO's 'Music for Days Like This': 4 cellos, 2 percussionists and a lot of unexpected - Barre Montpelier Times Argus

Posted: 11 Dec 2020 09:00 PM PST

When the Vermont Symphony Orchestra presents its second "Music for Days Like This," online at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 19, it will feature some unlikely ensembles, including VSO percussionists D. Thomas Toner and Nicola Cannizzaro.

"Seeing Tom and Nick play a percussion duo is a whole different world than seeing them play the bass drum, the triangle and maybe a cymbal in the symphony," explains Matt LaRocca, composer and the VSO's creative projects chairman, who curates the VSO's online programming.

If that weren't unusual enough, VSO cellists John Dunlop, Perri Morris, Bonnie Klimowski and Dieuwke Davydov will join the percussionists in works ranging from a commissioned world premiere to well-known music by Arvo Pärt and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. David Serkin Ludwig, composer, teacher and the VSO's new music adviser, hosts.

"Music for Days Like This" unlike Juke Box, which is streamed live, is recorded at the Elley-Long Music Center in Colchester.

"We recorded this in advance to have more behind-the-scenes footage, more interviews with people who are playing the music, people who have written music for it, which we can't do in a live show right now," La Rocca said.

A major purpose of both programs is to provide opportunities to VSO musicians during the COVID-19 pandemic.

"Since we're not going to play with an orchestra still for a long while yet, we really go out of our way to showcase the different chamber ensembles, and the different sides of the VSO that you don't see in a full orchestra concert," LaRocca said.

Opening the program is Mozart's beloved motet "Ave verum corpus," K. 618. But rather than a chorus, it will be performed in an arrangement for four cellos by W. Thomas-Mifune.

La Rocca compares Molly Joyce's "Release," the world premiere commission for the entire ensemble, with Pärt's "Fratres," which LaRocca arranged for the program.

"'Release' is a fantastic companion for the Pärt because it has a similar introspective quality," LaRocca said. "It uses a lot of similar tonal techniques, with harmonics in the beginning of it. Then it slowly transforms into this real celebratory (mood), whereas the Pärt stays introspective the whole time."

Joyce is a Juilliard-trained composer on the faculty of New York University, and active in the New York new music community. She is also a 2010 graduate of the Lake Champlain Chamber Music Festival's Young Composers Seminar in Colchestter.

"I think she's a brilliant composer," La Rocca said. "In my mind, she really inhabits this world of new music where, yes, it's classical, but she brings in other influences too, which makes a really interesting end product."

La Rocca calls "As One" by Gene Koshinsky "one of the coolest percussion duets I've ever seen."

"Watching it is as amazing as what you hear," he said. "It's one of those pieces where the actual choreography and movement that Tom and Nick do, it's so much fun to watch. They act like a mirror image to one another all the time while sharing this giant five-octave marimba."

Sydney Guillaume, a 38-year-old composer originally from Haiti, now living in Portland, Oregon, will be represented by "Lespwa" for cello ensemble.

"Lespwa is ancient Creole for hope," La Rocca said. "Sometimes when I program, I think of companion pieces. Here, I hear vestiges of the Mozart, especially in the cello arrangement, not necessarily if 'Ave verum corpus" was done traditionally. But his writing is really melodic, very sing-song. It's a beautiful piece."

"Slide Rule," written by percussionists Josh Gottry and Jonny Woodbury, is a duet for cojons, traditional 16th-century Afro-Peruvian box drums.

"It's upbeat and fun and kind of rocking," LaRocca said. "It's a little different from what we've usually done. It's fun to watch Tom and Nick."

"Canción de Sueños" and "Tango" from "Carole Neuen-Rabinowitz's "Suite Hispaniola" is for four cellos.

"Carole is a cellist from the Nashville Symphony, and also plays in the National String Machine," La Rocca said. "This is a very traditional four-cello suite over which Tom and Nick will be improvising."

LaRocca asked the composer how she felt about the percussionists improvising her music.

"She wrote back right away: 'I love it! Great!'" LaRocca said.

With this concert and the Jan. 16 Juke Box, the VSO's announced programs will end. What next?

"We're still trying to figure things out," La Rocca said. "We still are going to find a way to put on shows regardless.

"Between the two shows we've done, the responses have been overwhelmingly positive — which is great!" he said. "From our standpoint, we're really happy with what we've been able to put out."

jim.lowe @timesargus.com / jim.lowe @rutlandherald.com

A December to remember for more than 1700 Mountaineer graduates - Appalachian State University

Posted: 11 Dec 2020 05:31 PM PST

BOONE, N.C. — Approximately 4,000 Appalachian Community members gathered virtually during Appalachian State University's Fall 2020 Commencement to celebrate App State's more than 1,700 graduates — a class that has persevered during a global pandemic to reach this momentous milestone.

"You have earned one of the most significant achievements of your lifetime, and you did so under historically challenging circumstances. … We are so very proud of how you persevered and arrived at this momentous occasion with grace and unwavering resilience."

App State Chancellor Sheri Everts, in her address to App State's Class of 2020

During the ceremony — which can be viewed by visiting App State's commencement website — App State Chancellor Sheri Everts conferred degrees to 1,348 undergraduate and 361 graduate students who registered to be recognized in Fall 2020 Commencement.

The ceremony — which began with sweeping drone views of App State's campus — included remarks by Everts, C. Philip Byers '85, a member of the University of North Carolina Board of Governors, Interim Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor Heather Hulburt Norris and Executive Director of Alumni Affairs Stephanie Billings '92. Byers brought greetings from the UNC Board of Governors and the UNC System Office. Alumnus and WBTV News anchor John Carter '79 was the event's keynote speaker.

Their addresses were followed by remarks from two students representing the undergraduate and graduate Class of 2020. A Hayes School of Music graduate gave a vocal performance as part of the ceremony.

App State's alma mater was performed by Grammy-nominated country music artist Luke Combs.

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Appalachian State University's Savannah Travis, of Maiden, is pictured wearing a jacket that features the university's block A logo and the words "Class of 2020." Travis, who graduated summa cum laude from Appalachian State University Dec. 11, earned her B.S. in elementary education. Photo submitted

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Appalachian State University's Charles Fennell, of Charlotte, graduated from the university Dec. 11 with a B.S. in psychology with a concentration in natural science and a minor in statistics. "The mountains have provided me with tranquility and a unique community that will live forever in my heart," Fennell wrote in an Instagram post shared on App State's commencement website. Fennell plans to pursue a doctorate in behavioral neuroscience. Photo submitted

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Appalachian State University's Sharon Slakter, of Kernersville, graduated from App State Dec. 11 with a B.S. in elementary education with a concentration in visual arts. She is currently pursuing a master's degree in reading education through App State's Accelerated Admission program. Photo submitted

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Appalachian State University Class of 2020 graduate Jean Carlos Garcia Reyes, of Winston-Salem, earned his bachelor's degree in elementary education with a concentration in diversity Dec. 11. While at App State, he was part of the Reich College of Education's Appalachian Community of Education Scholars (ACES). His next steps after graduation include substitute teaching and the pursuit of a master's degree in reading education, along with a graduate certificate in teaching emergent bilingual populations in content areas — both from App State. Photo submitted

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Zoé Kincheloe (nee McCauley), of Raleigh, graduated cum laude from Appalachian State University Dec. 11 with a B.S. in middle grades education with concentrations in mathematics and science. From right to left, this photo collage shows Kincheloe as a child, a high schooler and in her most current state — an App State grad. In her Instagram post featured on App State's commencement website, Kincheloe wrote, "I was always supposed to be a teacher. I'm feeling excited and proud of how far I've come and how hard I've worked to get here." Photo submitted

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Leina Moore, of Crouse, graduated from Appalachian State University Dec. 11 with a B.S. in risk management and insurance, offered by App State's Walker College of Business. In the bottom left photo, Moore is pictured on the field of App State's Kidd Brewer Stadium, and in the top and bottom right photos, she is pictured with Boone's rolling Blue Ridge Mountains in the background. Photo by Samantha O'Brien

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Spenser Taylor, who graduated from Appalachian State University Dec. 11, is pictured wearing his regalia in the stands of App State's Kidd Brewer Stadium. Taylor, of Graham, earned his bachelor's degree in building sciences. Photo submitted

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Elisia McKnight, of Charlotte, graduated from Appalachian State University Dec. 11 with a B.S. in communication, public relations, offered through the College of Fine and Applied Arts. She is pictured on the steps outside App State's Turchin Center for the Visual Arts. During her time at the university, McKnight was involved in the Black Student Association and Minority Women's Leadership Circle. Photo submitted

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Pictured on the field of Appalachian State University's Kidd Brewer Stadium is Olivia Fletcher, of Fayetteville. Fletcher graduated from App State Dec. 11 with a B.S. in psychology with a concentration in health studies. In her Instagram post featured on App State's commencement website, Fletcher wrote, "I had an amazing experience here at App State and would not trade it for the world." Her next steps after graduation include pursuing Basic Law Enforcement Training. Photo submitted

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First-generation college student Kimberly Becerra, of Weaverville, is pictured in front of the Appalachian State University sign in Founders Plaza. Becerra graduated from App State Dec. 11 with a B.S. in communication, public relations, offered through the College of Fine and Applied Arts. In her Instagram post featured on App State's commencement website, Becerra wrote, "I'm so thankful to be able to graduate from such an amazing school and I definitely wouldn't take back any moment from my four years here. I am proud of this accomplishment and can't wait for what's next!" Photo by Brianna Messer

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Rheo Bruer, of Asheville, graduated from Appalachian State University Dec. 11 with a B.S. in computer science. "Thankful for the valuable knowledge and experience gained during my time at App!" Bruer wrote in a College of Arts and Sciences Instagram post shared on App State's commencement website. His plans after graduation include seeking a software engineering job and traveling. Photo submitted

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Charlotte native Eunice Bingolo graduated from Appalachian State University Dec. 11 with her B.S. in biology–cellular/molecular biology and a minor in chemistry. What's next for her after graduation? Securing a job and applying to medical school, according to Bingolo. Photo submitted

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First-generation college student Tatiana Magee '19, of Rutherfordton, graduated from Appalachian State University Dec. 11 with a master's degree in geography. Magee is a three-time graduate of App State; in addition to her master's degree, she holds a B.S. in geography and a B.S. in community and regional planning. She is pictured in North Carolina's Blue Ridge Mountains. Photo submitted

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Christopher Klutz, of Kernersville, graduated from Appalachian State University Dec. 11 with a Master of Public Administration. "The MPA from App State opens a lot of personal and professional opportunities," Klutz wrote in an Instagram post shared on App State's commencement website. Post-graduation, Klutz plans to continue his service in public safety. He is a 16-year fire service veteran and is currently employed full-time by High Point's fire department. He also serves as an assistant fire chief for multiple fire departments in the state's Piedmont Triad region. Photo submitted

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Audrey Hudson, of Salisbury, graduated from Appalachian State University Dec. 11 with a B.S. in psychology with a concentration in business and a minor in digital marketing. In a College of Arts and Sciences Instagram post shared on App State's commencement website, Hudson wrote, "I wouldn't be the same person without my experience at App State. My teachers, friends and organization have shaped who I am today." Hudson plans to pursue a career in marketing post-graduation. While at App State, Hudson was a member of Sigma Kappa sorority. Photo submitted

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Appalachian State University's Victoria Anderson, of Tryon, graduated cum laude from App State Dec. 11 with a B.S. in criminal justice–international studies. While at App State, Anderson served as a Student Ambassador and was supported by App State's Student Support Services program, which provides comprehensive services to low-income and/or first-generation college students. After graduation, she plans to work for a nonprofit organization in the Dominican Republic before pursuing her master's degree in business management. Photo submitted

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Appalachian State University Class of 2020 graduate Alec Bryan, of Greenville, is pictured riding his motorcycle — with robe and helmet donned and mortarboard in hand. Bryan graduated cum laude from App State Dec. 11 with a B.S. in industrial design–furniture design. Photo submitted

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Ashlyn Quick, of Wilson, graduated summa cum laude from Appalachian State University Dec. 11 with a B.S. in elementary education. In an Instagram post, Quick wrote, "I am officially a licensed teacher! Thank you to all of my friends, family, professors and those who have trusted me to learn with their children along the way." Quick will continue her education at App State in spring 2021 as part of the Accelerated Admission program, through which she will pursue a master's degree in reading education. Photo submitted

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Matthew Lance, of Germanton, graduated from Appalachian State University Dec. 11 with a B.S. in biology–ecology, evolution and environmental biology. In a Twitter post shared on App State's commencement website, Lance wrote, "The day has finally arrived! Thank you @appstate for many great friends, good times and wonderful experiences! App state — my home away from home." Photo submitted

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Appalachian State University's Chitambo Chikoya, from Lusaka, Zambia, graduated cum laude from App State Dec. 11 with a B.S. in biology–cellular/molecular biology. "My time at App State has been nothing less than life-changing," Chikoya wrote in an Instagram post shared by App State's College of Arts and Sciences. Chikoya's next steps after graduation include attending medical school in Zambia. Photo submitted

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First-generation college student Khalijah Simon, of Shelby, graduated from Appalachian State University Dec. 11, earning her B.S. in sociology with a concentration in criminology, deviance and law and a minor in criminal justice. In an Instagram post shared on App State's commencement website, Simon referenced her "three angels" — her mother, brother and grandmother, who have all passed away — writing, "… everything I do is for them and I'm gonna succeed at everything in life." Photo submitted

In her video address to graduates, Everts said, "You have earned one of the most significant achievements of your lifetime, and you did so under historically challenging circumstances: two consecutive semesters overshadowed by a global pandemic unlike anything the world has seen in more than a century. We are so very proud of how you persevered and arrived at this momentous occasion with grace and unwavering resilience."

She continued, "As App State graduates, you will be uniquely positioned to adapt, to lead and to serve in a world that has been fundamentally changed. You will make real and powerful differences in your communities and beyond."

"Graduates, your education at Appalachian State University has provided you well with the knowledge and skills you will need to achieve the goals and dreams you set forth. Your degree represents hard work and dedication to a most worthy goal."

UNC Board of Governors member C. Philip Byers '85

Byers, in his remarks, said, "Graduates, your education at Appalachian State University has provided you well with the knowledge and skills you will need to achieve the goals and dreams you set forth. Your degree represents hard work and dedication to a most worthy goal."

Provost Norris recognized App State's student veterans and military-affiliated graduates for their commitment to both their university studies and their service to the country. Undergraduate and graduate students were recognized for Latin honors — the cum laude, magna cum laude and summa cum laude distinctions awarded based on academic achievement, as well as university honors through App State's Honors College. The top 2% of graduate students who achieved induction into the Cratis D. Williams Society were also recognized for their academic success in research, professional practice, leadership and community engagement.

"To the parents, other family members and friends of our graduating students: Be proud of these graduates. … Be proud of what you have done to help them achieve this important milestone," said Norris in her video address to graduates.

Billings brought the Class of 2020 greetings and congratulations from App State's living alumni — a group of more than 134,000 individuals worldwide. Watch her video address.

The online event has received approximately 4,000 views — and counting.

Graduates and App State faculty shared their celebratory commencement photos through various social media channels. See App State's commencement website for more Class of 2020 photos and congratulatory messages.

'Step up and do great things'

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Appalachian State University alumnus and WBTV News anchor John Carter '79 served as the keynote speaker for App State's virtual Fall 2020 Commencement. Carter is a former entrepreneur and North Carolina senator who represented the state's 25th District. He holds a bachelor's degree in communication arts with a concentration in broadcasting from App State. Photo courtesy of John Carter

App State alumnus and WBTV News anchor John Carter '79 — a retired state senator and entrepreneur, as well as a graduate of the university's College of Fine and Applied Arts — joined App State's virtual commencement from Charlotte's WBTV News studio. Watch his video address to App State's Class of 2020.

"Make a positive difference in this world, even if it only impacts one other person. You don't have to change the world, although you can."

App State alumnus, WBTV News anchor and Fall 2020 Commencement keynote speaker John Carter '79

Carter said he found his life's passion — news broadcasting — while working for 90.5 WASU-FM, App State's student-run radio station. He advised graduates to create a roadmap or a goal they can use to guide their path as they pursue their own passions and career aspirations post-graduation.

He also encouraged App State's Class of 2020 to "step up and do great things in your life. Make a positive difference in this world, even if it only impacts one other person. You don't have to change the world, although you can," he said.

App State 'prepared me for life's challenges'

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Wendell Addy, of Raleigh, graduated from Appalachian State University Dec. 11 with a BSBA in computer information systems. Addy, who was named the Walker College of Business' top computer information systems student for 2020, served as the undergraduate student speaker during App State's virtual Fall 2020 Commencement. Photo by Marie Freeman

In his address to his peers, Walker College of Business graduate Wendell Addy encouraged App States' Class of 2020 to embrace uncertainty, citing American lawyer and New York Times best-selling author Bob Goff — "Some of the most beautiful chapters in our lives won't have a title until much later." Watch his commencement address.

"As I look to the future, I am filled with optimism and excitement knowing I am a product of this great institution," Addy said. "Being at App State molded me academically and it taught me patience, the importance of sustainability and stewardship, how to find my purpose and, most importantly, it prepared me for life's challenges."

Addy, of Raleigh, graduated with a Bachelor of Science in business administration (BSBA) in computer information systems. He has secured a full-time position with Citrix Systems Inc., a multinational computer software company, and will soon serve as a technical analyst at the company's Fort Lauderdale, Florida, headquarters.

'We are truly history in the making'

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Jennifer McCracken, of Hickory, served as the graduate student speaker during Appalachian State University's virtual Fall 2020 Commencement Dec. 11. McCracken, who graduated from App State with a Master of Public Administration with a concentration in public management, is Catawba County's public health director. Photo by Marie Freeman

Jennifer McCracken, who served as commencement's graduate student speaker, fulfilled a promise she made to herself and her father 23 years ago — she graduated from App State with her Master of Public Administration degree with a concentration in public management. She was also honored with induction into the university's Cratis D. Williams Society. Watch her address to the Class of 2020.

McCracken, who completed her degree through App State Online's MPA distance education program, is health director of Catawba County Public Health (CCPH) — a position she has held since mid-March, when the county announced its first case of COVID-19.

"We are truly history in the making," she said to her fellow graduates. "One of the most important lessons this pandemic has taught me is that challenges bring opportunities — sometimes you just have to look for them. … The challenge of this pandemic has given us new ideas, new ways of communicating, new perspectives and a new appreciation for personal connection."

She continued, "Did any of us plan to go to school in a pandemic, graduate in a pandemic, or look for a job in a pandemic? The answer is no. However, as we leave Appalachian, we leave stronger because we finished our race in the midst of adversity, and we finished it well."

Musical performances

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Hayes School of Music graduate Samantha Latino, of Charlotte, performed John Ireland's "If There Were Dreams to Sell," with piano accompaniment by Hayes School of Music Dean James Douthit, as part of Appalachian State University's Fall 2020 Commencement. Latino graduated with three degrees from App State: a Bachelor of Music (B.M.) in music education–general music education (K–12), a B.M. in music education–choral music education (K–12) and a B.M. in music performance–voice. Photo by Marie Freeman

Award-winning country music artist Luke Combs, who attended App State from 2008–12, played App State's alma mater and congratulated the university's Class of 2020 on their accomplishment, encouraging them to "have fun out in the world." View and listen to his App State commencement performance.

Hayes School of Music graduate Samantha Latino, of Charlotte, also performed during the ceremony, singing "If There Were Dreams to Sell," composed by John Ireland. Dr. James Douthit, dean of the Hayes School of Music, provided piano accompaniment.

Latino, who graduated magna cum laude, earned three App State degrees: a Bachelor of Music (B.M.) music education–general music education (K–12), a B.M. in music education–choral music education (K–12) and a B.M. in music performance–voice.

Other music performances for the ceremony included the singing of the national anthem by Ear Candy, App State's all-female a cappella group, which harmonized via Zoom while physical distancing. Watch and listen to Ear Candy's performance of the national anthem.

The traditional "Pomp and Circumstance" graduation march was performed by members of the Brass Choir in App State's Hayes School of Music, who were conducted by the college's Dr. James Stokes, professor of trumpet. The piece was produced and audio engineered by Scott Wynne, professor of music industry studies and chief recording engineer for the university's Robert F. Gilley Recording Studio.

Visit App State's commencement website to re-watch the ceremony and view more social media posts by the newest class of App State graduates.

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More on the commencement speakers and HSOM performer

After graduating from App State in 1979 with a bachelor's degree in communication arts with a concentration in broadcasting, John Carter began working as a news assistant at Charlotte's WBTV, where he held several different positions from 1979–89. He eventually returned to WBTV in 1996 to anchor its morning news show and later "WBTV News at Noon."

Carter has received numerous awards and honors for his video and journalistic work. He is also a 1992 recipient of the Order of the Long Leaf Pine, North Carolina's highest civilian award. In spring 2014, he delivered the commencement address for App State's College of Fine and Applied Arts.

Undergraduate student speaker Wendell Addy, who was born in Liberia and grew up in Texas, graduated from App State as 2020's top computer information systems (CIS) student in the Walker College of Business. The 4.0 GPA senior holds an associate degree from Wake Technical Community College.

In addition to a scholarship he received for the top 2020 CIS student honor, Addy was awarded merit-based scholarships when he was accepted to App State, which he said enabled him to focus on his coursework and professional development. In the 2019–20 academic year, he earned a spot on the Chancellor's List — awarded to full-time students with a GPA of 3.85 or higher. He also was inducted into Beta Gamma Sigma, a national honor society for business students.

Grad student speaker Jennifer McCracken said her pursuit of App State's MPA has exposed her to broader areas of government and provided her with advanced knowledge in finance, budgeting, health policy, personnel administration and program evaluation — knowledge she can apply directly in her current role to reimagine local public health both during and in the aftermath of the pandemic.

"The relationships I have built while at App State are some of my most valuable," said McCracken, who holds a B.S. in nursing and a certificate in public health leadership from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "I not only have lifelong colleagues but lifelong friends."

Hayes School of Music commencement performer Samantha Latino was introduced to App State by the university's Cannon Music Camp, a three-week, residential course of musical instruction course for high school students offered during the summer. Latino was a"Cannon camper" for three years. "The camp allowed me an inside look on what being a music student at App State would be like, in addition to getting to know App State's faculty, campus and culture," she said.

Latino is a recipient of the Joe and Anna Phelps Music Scholarship and the Mariam Cannon Hayes Endowment for Music Excellence Scholarship. "My scholarships provided me with not only financial assistance but the knowledge that other people believed in me," she said. After graduating, Latino aims to teach music in North Carolina at the elementary level. She is also considering pursuing a future master's degree in vocal performance.

Thousands celebrate #AppStateClassof2020

App State's second virtual commencement has received approximately 4,000 views — and counting.

Graduates and App State faculty shared their celebratory commencement photos through various social media channels, including Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, by using the hashtags #AppStateClassof2020, #AppStateGrad and #AppStateAlumni, and the tags @AppState and @AppAlumni.

In one Instagram post featured on App State's commencement website, graduate Tatiana Magee '19, of Rutherfordton, shared, "I've worked hard to earn every scholarship along the way that has helped fund my education. I hope to pay it forward one day for other people to be able to achieve their goals, academic or not, without the burden of debt. Higher education doesn't make you a better person. How you treat those around you and what you do with your privilege, power and platform does."

Magee, who is a first-generation college student, earned several academic scholarships during her time at App State, which not only helped fund her study abroad in Peru in summer 2018 but allowed her to "focus more on my studies … and meet with professors and help them on their research," she said in a video about the impact of her scholarships.

Magee earned her master's degree in geography from App State Dec. 11. She holds two App State bachelor's degrees — one in geography and one in community and regional planning.

Check out App State's commencement website for more photos and messages celebrating the university's newest class of alumni.

Degree candidates

HSOM Brass Choir members

  • Trumpet 1 — Robert McCormac '19, a graduate student in HSOM's music performance program who is also pursuing a master's in Appalachian studies with a concentration is Appalachian culture and music.
  • Trumpet 2 — Robert Carmichael, a December Class of 2020 graduate with a B.M. in music education from Chapel Hill.
  • Horn — Andrew Hicks, a spring Class of 2020 graduate with a B.M. in music education from Hickory.
  • Trombone — Zachary McRary, a spring Class of 2020 graduate with a B.M. in music performance from Lenoir.
  • Bass Trombone — Zack Litty, a spring Class of 2020 graduate with a B.M. in music performance from Apex.
  • Tuba — Cody Chessor, a spring Class of 2020 graduate with a B.M. in music performance from Trinity.

Ear Candy members

  • Bridgette Brody, a senior child development major from Charlotte.
  • Jordan Buchanan, of Lenoir, a former student of the Hayes School of Music.
  • Alexandra Cagwin, a senior music therapy major from Matthews.
  • Arianna Carrero, a sophomore communication, advertising major from Durham.
  • Emily Cheek, a December Class of 2020 graduate with a B.M. in music therapy. Cheek is from Waxhaw.
  • Kyra Crider, a junior sociology major from Hillsborough.
  • Skyler Davidson, a senior music therapy major from Wilmington.
  • Jacey Edwards, a junior marketing major from Fuquay Varina.
  • Dev Feeley, a sophomore graphic design major from Waxhaw.
  • Sarah Gleiter, a senior sociology major from Chapel Hill.
  • Jenna Larcara, a sophomore music industry studies major from Matthews.
  • Katie Ost, a spring Class of 2020 graduate with a B.S. in nursing. Ost is from Cary.
  • Avery Perkinson, a sophomore communication, electronic media/broadcasting major from Hillsborough.
  • Zoe Raymond, a junior public health major from Apex.
  • Brooke Rollins, a senior elementary education major from Charlotte.
  • Veronica Romero, a spring Class of 2020 graduate with a BFA in graphic design. Romero is from Cary.
  • Taqavea Searcy, a junior accounting major from Stoneville.
  • Alex Shell, of McDonough, Georgia, a former student of App State's University College.
Fall 2020 Commencement

Commencement is the ultimate celebration of one of the most significant accomplishments of their lifetimes. This is our second virtual ceremony, and we have worked hard to provide a memorable commencement experience for our fall 2020 graduates. You have been determined and resilient in order to reach this stage in your academic career. We are proud to honor your achievement.

More than 1,700 Mountaineer graduates to be recognized during App State's virtual Fall Commencement

Dec. 7, 2020

App State will recognize more than 1,700 Mountaineer Class of 2020 graduates — including 1,348 undergraduate and 361 graduate students — during its virtual Fall 2020 Commencement. The guest speaker for this year's event is alumnus and WBTV News anchor John Carter '79.

Alumnus Profile: John Carter '79

WBTV morning news anchor John Carter got his start in the Charlotte market with an undergraduate communications degree from Appalachian.

The sky is the limit for this high-achieving Mountaineer

Nov. 17, 2020

Graduating senior Wendell Addy has achieved a perfect 4.0 GPA as a computer information systems major, and after completing three virtual internships this summer, he had a choice of job offers in the technology field.

About Appalachian State University

As the premier public undergraduate institution in the state of North Carolina, Appalachian State University prepares students to lead purposeful lives as global citizens who understand and engage their responsibilities in creating a sustainable future for all. The Appalachian Experience promotes a spirit of inclusion that brings people together in inspiring ways to acquire and create knowledge, to grow holistically, to act with passion and determination, and to embrace diversity and difference. Located in the Blue Ridge Mountains, Appalachian is one of 17 campuses in the University of North Carolina System. Appalachian enrolls more than 20,000 students, has a low student-to-faculty ratio and offers more than 150 undergraduate and graduate majors.

Thousands join campaign to save music degrees at Keele University - Stoke-on-Trent Live

Posted: 11 Dec 2020 09:00 PM PST

More than 3,000 people are calling on Keele University to reverse its plans to scrap music-related degrees.

Campaigners say the music and music technology programmes are world-renowned and have provided a foundation for careers in creative industries.

But the university maintains they are no longer financially viable and the undergraduate intake on these courses has dwindled from 47 in 2014/5 to just 14 students in 2020/21. All current students would be able to complete their degrees under plans to phase out the subjects by 2023.

Yet staff have disputed these recruitment figures and claim attempts to introduce innovative new music courses were 'blocked' by managers.

Now an online petition, set up by affected academics at Keele, has attracted around 3,700 signatures in just three days.

Students currently have access to cutting edge recording studios as part of the university programmes
Students currently have access to recording studios as part of the university programmes

It states: "The decision leaves a number of postgraduate students without principal thesis advisers, and half a dozen or so applications for higher degrees in music composition, music technology, ethnomusicology and musicology in limbo as the programmes are phased out by August 2023.

"The university has still to advise students about the decision. By this time, the final-year students will be left feeling undervalued by the university."

The campaigners claim the move will also have a 'negative impact on the music education' of communities in Newcastle and Stoke-on-Trent.

At an undergraduate level, music is currently only offered as a joint honours degree, while music technology can be taken on its own or with another subject.

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Staff include renowned composers, instrumental teachers and those involved in a range of music research. Keele also boasts cutting edge recording studios.

Among those signing the petition is Keele music and electronics graduate Mark Ayres.

He said: "I went on to compose music for Doctor Who and work with the BBC radiophonic workshop. Music at Keele was always special – way ahead of the game."

Kirsty Caine, who studied music at Keele at both undergraduate and postgraduate level, said: "It was the best educational experience I have ever had. I had so many opportunities. The work that was being undertaken there was literally world-class.

"I cannot believe the short-sightedness of the university management in making this decision."

Hannah Bayley is currently taking a PhD in music at Keele. She said: "The department offers so much to the university, the wider academic and local communities. This would all be lost."

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Keele has a variety of student-led performing groups and music staff also conduct Keele Philharmonic Orchestra.

The university stresses the decision to axe music courses will not affect other cultural activities on campus, including concert bands and choirs.

In a statement, Keele officials said: "This is a very difficult decision to make and is not one that we will make lightly.

"We would much prefer to maintain the subject with thriving and popular degree programmes, but there is no evidence that we can reverse student trends to the extent required to make the programmes viable.

"As such, we will soon be opening a period of consultation with relevant staff and stakeholders to consider the withdrawal of these programmes."

The petition is on the change.org website.

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