Fox's Tubi Just Surpassed Peacock as the Free Streaming Name to Watch - Nasdaq

Fox's Tubi Just Surpassed Peacock as the Free Streaming Name to Watch - Nasdaq Fox's Tubi Just Surpassed Peacock as the Free Streaming Name to Watch - Nasdaq Posted: 01 Feb 2021 12:00 AM PST [unable to retrieve full-text content] Fox's Tubi Just Surpassed Peacock as the Free Streaming Name to Watch    Nasdaq You are subscribed to email updates from "fully online ota program,online mba programs" - Google News . To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now . Email delivery powered by Google Google, 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043, United States

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds signs law requiring schools to offer 100% in-person learning option - Des Moines Register

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds signs law requiring schools to offer 100% in-person learning option - Des Moines Register


Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds signs law requiring schools to offer 100% in-person learning option - Des Moines Register

Posted: 29 Jan 2021 12:00 AM PST

[unable to retrieve full-text content]Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds signs law requiring schools to offer 100% in-person learning option  Des Moines Register

US coronavirus death total approaches population size of Atlanta - 11Alive.com WXIA

Posted: 21 Feb 2021 01:31 PM PST

A year into the pandemic, the running total of lives lost was about 498,000 — roughly the population of Kansas City, Missouri, and just shy of the size of Atlanta.

WASHINGTON — The U.S. stood Sunday at the brink of a once-unthinkable tally: 500,000 people lost to the coronavirus.

A year into the pandemic, the running total of lives lost was about 498,000 — roughly the population of Kansas City, Missouri, and just shy of the size of Atlanta. The figure compiled by Johns Hopkins University surpasses the number of people who died in 2019 of chronic lower respiratory diseases, stroke, Alzheimer's, flu and pneumonia combined.

"It's nothing like we have ever been through in the last 102 years, since the 1918 influenza pandemic," the nation's top infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, said on CNN's "State of the Union."

The U.S. virus death toll reached 400,000 on Jan. 19 in the waning hours in office for President Donald Trump, whose handling of the crisis was judged by public health experts to be a singular failure.

The nation could pass this next grim milestone on Monday. President Joe Biden will mark the U.S. crossing 500,000 lives lost from COVID-19 with a moment of silence and candle lighting ceremony at the White House.

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Biden will deliver remarks at sunset to honor the dead, the White House said. He's expected to be joined by first lady Jill Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris and her husband, Doug Emhoff.

The first known deaths from the virus in the U.S. happened in early February 2020, both of them in Santa Clara County, California. It took four months to reach the first 100,000 dead. The toll hit 200,000 deaths in September and 300,000 in December. Then it took just over a month to go from 300,000 to 400,000 and about two months to climb from 400,000 to the brink of 500,000.

Joyce Willis of Las Vegas is among the countless Americans who lost family members during the pandemic. Her husband, Anthony Willis, died Dec. 28, followed by her mother-in-law in early January.

There were anxious calls from the ICU when her husband was hospitalized. She was unable to see him before he died because she, too, had the virus and could not visit.

"They are gone. Your loved one is gone, but you are still alive," Willis said. "It's like you still have to get up every morning. You have to take care of your kids and make a living. There is no way around it. You just have to move on."

Then came a nightmare scenario of caring for her father-in-law while dealing with grief, arranging funerals, paying bills, helping her children navigate online school and figuring out how to go back to work as an occupational therapist.

Her father-in-law, a Vietnam vet, also contracted the virus. He also suffered from respiratory issues and died on Feb. 8. The family isn't sure if COVID-19 contributed to his death.

"Some days I feel OK and other days I feel like I'm strong and I can do this," she said. "And then other days it just hits me. My whole world is turned upside-down."

The global death toll was approaching 2.5 million, according to Johns Hopkins.

While the count is based on figures supplied by government agencies around the world, the real death toll is believed to be significantly higher, in part because of inadequate testing and cases inaccurately attributed to other causes early on.

Despite efforts to administer coronavirus vaccines, a widely cited model by the University of Washington projects the U.S. death toll will surpass 589,000 by June 1.

"People will be talking about this decades and decades and decades from now," Fauci said on NBC's "Meet The Press."

Associated Press Writer Heather Hollingsworth in Kansas City, Missouri, contributed to this report.

We need schools to reopen now - OCRegister

Posted: 18 Feb 2021 09:56 AM PST

Late in the evening of March 12, 2020, I received a message from the superintendent of my children's school district announcing the immediate closure of all campuses. The closure would last three weeks. It was meant to mitigate the spread of the coronavirus.

As our community hunkered down, my husband and I told our kids that this could be fun! Even though I'm in treatment for metastatic breast cancer, which means being the 24/7 mom on duty has an added layer of challenge, I welcomed the extra family time. We slept in, relaxed our screen-time rules and took on overly complex baking projects.

By late April, schools across the nation were closing. Teachers scrambled to develop "distance learning" plans. Parents scrambled to balance work and other obligations with supervising their children's at-home learning. I scrambled to figure out how I could possibly homeschool two young children, one of whom has special needs, while also undergoing cancer treatment.

But, despite the shock and inconvenience of it all, I thoroughly understood our collective predicament. We would all have to rise to this challenge together.

That was 11 months ago.

In October, things got so bad for my dyslexic 5th grader that I pulled him from school entirely. My 2nd grader now breaks down in tears several times a day. A recent letter signed by Bay Area physicians put my kids' situation into context: Every day, doctors are seeing more children hospitalized with acute mental health crises, suicidal thoughts and eating disorders stemming from depression, anxiety and social isolation.

My husband and I no longer joke about this being "fun." We are barely holding it together. In the meantime, to our dismay, private schools all around us are open for in-person instruction. Public schools in other states and wealthier public school districts in California are also open for in-person instruction. Parents with means are fleeing. A friend of mine temporarily moved to Hawaii so her children could attend public school in-person. They are thriving.

There is no reason all public-school families in California should not be thriving too. When basic safety precautions are in place, the risk to anyone of contracting COVID-19 in a school setting – child or adult – seems tiny. And public health officials, from my local district to the World Health Organization, agree that this risk should not outweigh the actual harm being done to children.

Despite this, parents are currently stuck in the middle of an epic standoff between school districts, government officials and teacher unions. Union leaders insist on defining the safety measures required to return to work, even when they are not in accordance with public health guidelines.

Unfortunately, when the CDC finally released its guidance on school reopening last week, they included one of the unions' most controversial demands – tying on-campus learning to community infection rates. Some experts are denouncing this and other aspects of the guidelines because, again, some evidence confirms that transmission rates in schools can be kept low even when community infections rates are high.

Enough with the political games. We need you all to step up, figure this out and get our children the help they need and deserve. Science should be guiding decisions about when to reopen schools, not politics, misinformation or fear.

I believe in the power and promise of public education. But in this moment, nearly a year into this distance learning fiasco, I have had it. The educational leadership in our state has failed California's public-school families. They have failed my children. They have failed me.

That schools remain closed despite evidence that they can and should be open is a moral failure. It's harming our children – particularly those who were already the most vulnerable – and it's risking the long-term stability of California's public education system.

To those who have the power to make this right, your bureaucratic paralysis must end. It's time to put our children's well-being at the center of this discussion, stop with the excuses and get them back in the classroom.

Leda Dederich is a public-school parent from Berkeley, Leda.dederich@gmail.com.

US coronavirus death toll approaches milestone of 500,000 - KSTP

Posted: 21 Feb 2021 05:27 PM PST

The first known deaths from the virus in the U.S. happened in early February 2020, both of them in Santa Clara County, California. It took four months to reach the first 100,000 dead. The toll hit 200,000 deaths in September and 300,000 in December. Then it took just over a month to go from 300,000 to 400,000 and about two months to climb from 400,000 to the brink of 500,000.

KSTP's latest coronavirus coverage

Joyce Willis of Las Vegas is among the countless Americans who lost family members during the pandemic. Her husband, Anthony Willis, died Dec. 28, followed by her mother-in-law in early January.

There were anxious calls from the ICU when her husband was hospitalized. She was unable to see him before he died because she, too, had the virus and could not visit.

"They are gone. Your loved one is gone, but you are still alive," Willis said. "It's like you still have to get up every morning. You have to take care of your kids and make a living. There is no way around it. You just have to move on."

Then came a nightmare scenario of caring for her father-in-law while dealing with grief, arranging funerals, paying bills, helping her children navigate online school and figuring out how to go back to work as an occupational therapist.

Her father-in-law, a Vietnam vet, also contracted the virus. He also suffered from respiratory issues and died on Feb. 8. The family isn't sure if COVID-19 contributed to his death.

"Some days I feel OK and other days I feel like I'm strong and I can do this," she said. "And then other days it just hits me. My whole world is turned upside-down."

The global death toll was approaching 2.5 million, according to Johns Hopkins.

Weekend COVID-19 vaccination appointments delayed in Minnesota due to winter storms

While the count is based on figures supplied by government agencies around the world, the real death toll is believed to be significantly higher, in part because of inadequate testing and cases inaccurately attributed to other causes early on.

Despite efforts to administer coronavirus vaccines, a widely cited model by the University of Washington projects the U.S. death toll will surpass 589,000 by June 1.

"People will be talking about this decades and decades and decades from now," Fauci said on NBC's "Meet The Press."

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CSUF College of Business and Economics gets $1 million gift - OCRegister

Posted: 19 Feb 2021 07:44 AM PST

Cal State Fullerton alumnus and active supporter Terry Giles, a 1970 graduate, recently committed to gifting $1 million through the Giles O'Malley Foundation to the CSUF College of Business & Economics Center for Leadership, a resource that connects students with the local business community through education, training and outreach.

"Terry Giles' gift puts CSUF on the map as an institution that can attract great leaders to the Titan table and demonstrates that we can provide our students with world-class mentors and resources for long-term success," said Paul Stover, senior director of development at CSUF's College of Business & Economics.

Giles' career path after graduating from CSUF has been unique and varied, taking him from the courtroom to the boardroom, with many stops in between.

But it is his time as a Titan and a member of the school's debate team that stands out to Giles — formative years that prepared him for each role he has filled over the last five decades.

"I've had a very lucky, very fortunate career … but I really owe it back to what I learned at Cal State Fullerton and their debate program," Giles said. "Debate was probably the most important thing I was ever taught. It taught you a way to think. It taught you how to handle yourself from the standpoint of being able to stand and deliver."

Born in the Ozarks of Missouri, Giles had an unstable and challenging childhood, attending 21 schools in his first 10 years of education.

A move to California brought some permanence as Giles attended Magnolia High School in Anaheim and found a home on the school's speech and debate team.

After earning a top-100 ranking among high school debaters from across the country, Giles caught the eye of then CSUF debate program coach Lucy Keele and was quickly recruited to join the Titans team.

After earning a communications degree and serving one year in the Army, Giles headed to Pepperdine University to pursue a law degree. In the mid-1970s, he opened and built what became a high-profile criminal defense law firm in Orange County, where over a decade he tried a total of 90 cases to verdict, including 13 murder cases and three death penalty cases.

Eventually, Giles decided to take a different path as a business owner. Toyota of Garden Grove, Pacific National Bank and manufacturing firms are just a few of the 35 companies he has owned over the years.

Giles later stepped back into law as a civil attorney, handling an additional 60 cases, including representing 150 victims of sex abuse in the Roman Catholic Church. Currently living in Houston, Texas, with his wife, Kalli O'Malley, he is chairman of Landmark Worldwide, which serves the personal and professional growth industry, as well as owner and president of Giles Enterprises, which owns two luxury hotels in Europe. Giles also authored "The Fifteen Percent: Overcoming Hardships and Achieving Lasting Success" and managed Dr. Ben Carson's 2016 presidential campaign.

Giles' support of the Titan community began several years ago when he sponsored scholarships for the school's debate program, giving back to the experience that left an indelible mark on his career. He was also an initial contributor to the Center for Leadership when it got its start in 2009 and felt that providing funds for the Center to be endowed into perpetuity "seemed like the right thing to do."

"They've done a great job over these 10 years, growing it and making it really one of the best leadership schools in the country," Giles said.

The gift will allow the center to add programming and staffing that will continue to better equip CSUF students to make a positive impact in the community. Giles also is committed to partnering with CSUF to continue to raise money through his corporate and philanthropic networks.

"Terry sees his philanthropy as a way of providing direct leadership to encourage others to also invest in the Center for Leadership," Stover said. "He is totally committed to its success, which is a hallmark of Terry's style of leadership."

As a first-generation college graduate who came from humble beginnings, and one who has seen first hand the opportunities that higher education can provide, Giles admires that CSUF is still serving that same demographic in their student body today.

"That was true for me," said Giles, "and it's so wonderful to still see that occurring, and the difference that (these students) can now make in their family's life and in their future family's lives by doing what they're doing and working hard. I respect what each of them has gone through to get to where they are."

For more information on the Center for Leadership in the College of Business and Economics, visit business.fullerton.edu/engagement/leadership

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